Key IT Roles for Driving Business Value


Contract-to-Hire-BlogI’ve posted at length about the Business Relationship Manager (BRM) role as being key to driving business value from IT. But what other roles—typically under-served—work with the BRM in the pursuit of business value from IT?
In this post, I am going to introduce three dimensions of value realization than are important to driving business value. Along with those dimensions, I will discuss three roles that are associated with those disciplines.

Note: This post refers to roles. A role is not the same thing as a job. Think of a role as a ‘hat’ you wear if you meet certain qualifications (possess certain competencies). When you are qualified to wear a given hat, you have certain responsibilities and accountabilities. Roles, the competencies they demand, the processes in which they participate, and the ways they engage with other roles are all characteristics that are defined in an IT Operating Model. Some people will fill multiple roles, depending upon circumstances and needs.

Three Dimensions of Value Realization

So, how does IT increase its impact on Business Value Realization? There are three major value sources that the IT organization can impact:

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 1.21.31 PMLet’s examine each of these dimensions.

Shaping Business Demand

At low maturity, an IT organization is often referred to as “order takers” for business requests. One the face of it, this sounds customer-centric and responsive. However, the reality is that at low maturity, much  business demand yields relatively little business value. It’s also the case than when the business client has already figured out what they need before the engage IT (or if the business client has depended upon external consultants and vendors to tell them what they need) then the IT organization’s opportunities to add value are very limited.

If an IT organization is able to engage with their business partners earlier—to be proactive, not simply responsive, they can stimulate, surface and shape demand towards higher value opportunities. And these high value opportunities tend to suppress demand for low value activities, so more people are working on high value opportunities.

Shaping business demand is an important discipline for increasing IT maturity, and with it, driving more value from IT. Associated with this discipline is the role of Business Relationship Manager (BRM)—a role that sits between an IT organization and its business clients. In leading practice organizations, the BRM role (or whatever label it goes by) is focused on demand management, with an eye to elevating business value of IT.

Leveraging IT Assets and Information

At low IT maturity, much effort goes towards establishing a supportive, reliable and predictable infrastructure and the business applications that depend upon that infrastructure. Typically, these business applications go significantly under-leveraged. The cost, effort and business disruption associated with their deployment tends to lead to a mentality of “declare success and move on!” The business users need time to get back their breath. They also need to be shown new ways to leverage the platforms and the mountains of information they generate. Also, while IT organizations typically do a good job maintaining these business applications, there is no single role focused on managing their total lifetime value.

In order to increase maturity, architectural and asset management disciplines must be established around business applications, so as to create business platforms and products that enable business process improvement and innovation. Platforms are inherently extensible and readily leveraged—think about the iPhone as a platform, with open, published Application Programming Interfaces (API), the Apple Store and thousands of apps available to run on that platform.

The role responsible for these architectural and asset management disciplines is referred to as Product Management, and is an important aspect of reaching higher maturity and driving business value—ensuring that the full potential value of Business Platforms and Products is exploited and harvested. The BRM role works closely with Product Managers to help create the business appetite for new business capability that leverages the underlying business platforms and products.

Optimizing Business Use

While low maturity IT organizations focus on building, implementing and maintaining business solutions, as maturity increases the focus expands to help optimize the business value realized though using these solutions. This depends upon the discipline of Value Management, which in turn leverages competencies in Business Change Management and Portfolio Management.

There are several roles that are involved in Value Management—that of the Business Sponsor for a given initiative, Portfolio Manager, Business Change Consultant and, again, the BRM with their focus on demand management and business value realization.

In future posts, I will explore each of these disciplines and roles, and how these can be established as part of your IT Operating Model.

Note: My next on-line BRMP Certification courses are being held across 3 Mondays—July 7, 14 and 21, 2014 and 3 Tuesdays—September 2, 9 and 16 . For details, please click here.

Image provided courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Key IT Roles for Driving Business Value

  1. Pingback: Key IT Roles for Driving Business Value | I can...

  2. Pingback: How Do You Optimize IT Capabilities for Business Value? | IT Organization Circa 2017

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